Treating your high blood pressure

Treating your high blood pressure


“Mark: We are back with Dr. Jeff Harp from Highland Family Medicine continuing our conversation on blood pressure. Doctor, good to see you. Dr. Harp: Thank you. Mark: All right, remind us, what numbers called prehypertension. Those numbers move a little bit. Recently we adjusted them down because we realized it is better for people to have a little bit lower blood pressure. Mark: I see. If we determine if someone’s blood pressure is too high or elevated, how do we treat it? Dr. Harp: So, the thing that we like to do in Primary Care is not to get to the point of having to use medicine. So, even if early, and our treatment is to change one’s life, the way one lives, in order to make the blood pressure come down. Mark: And that’s for people who have high blood pressure. Even if they’re in that middle ground where you’re talking about prehypertension, correct? Dr. Harp: Right. Exactly. Mark: OK. What kinds of things beyond that can people do to try to avoid high blood avoiding lots fo salt. And there’s a thing called the DASH diet that’s out there that one can look up online that talks about low salt and healthy living. Maintaining a normal body weight, so that’s a BMI of less than 25. There’s BMI calculators people can find online to look at what their BMI is. So either maintaining it or achieving it. And then getting regular exercise. It’s recommended that we exercise about an hour, excuse me two and a half hours a week. Moderate exeercise so that we have to work on our breathing. Not just walking, but like identified at a greater risk or it’s been established that they have a higher level, at that point, how are we monitoring to see how they are doing in terms of blood pressure? Dr. Harp: Right, so, probably seeing one’s primary care clinician, whoever that may be on a regular basis. Seeing how you are doing. Checking in at the grocery store or at the drugstore to check pressure like cigarette smoking, drinking too much alcohol. Really making changes in one’s life and then going and checking and seeing how it’s working. Mark: Sure. Take charge. That sounds to me like the key message there. Dr. Harp: That’s right. Mark: OK, doctor, thank you. Dr. Harp: Sure. Mark: Appreciate it. So, that’s part two in our

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