Transposition of the Great Arteries

Transposition of the Great Arteries


Transposition of the great arteries Transposition of the great arteries occurs when the aorta and pulmonary artery are transposed. In a normal heart, blue oxygen-poor blood returns to the body through the right atrium and goes to the lungs via the pulmonary artery. Red oxygen-rich blood then returns to the left atrium, enters the left ventricle, and goes to the body via the aorta. In transposition, blue oxygen-poor blood returns to the body through the right
atrium, enters the right ventricle, and goes to the body via the aorta,
bypassing the lungs. Red oxygen-rich blood is pumped back into the lungs via the pulmonary artery without going to the body. As a result, newborns with TGA are born
with the bluish appearance known as cyanosis. In TGA, there needs to be a connection between the right and left sides of the heart, so oxygen-rich blood can reach the body. Most commonly this occurs between the
atrium, or upper chambers of the heart. This is inside of the right atrium. In a normal heart, this hole is closed to separate blood in the two upper chambers. A Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) is a partially closed connection between the top chambers. An Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) is a completely open hole between the top chambers. In TGA, there needs to be an ASD or PFO so that oxygen-rich blood can reach the body. In order to establish normal blood flow
surgery is needed in the first couple weeks of life. This involves switching the aorta and
pulmonary artery to their normal location.

25 Replies to “Transposition of the Great Arteries”

  1. My baby was born with this defect. This video was published on his 10th birthday. How neat is that. 

  2. This is by far the best animation of the heart I have ever seen. You have done a good job. I wish I could find videos explaining the heart anatomy and physiology in as good manner and as perfect animation.

  3. My son was born with Transportation of the great vessels. he is 54 now. He had an operation at 25. Now he needs it replaced. Also the patch between the ventricles. Would like to know if this was done on someone of this age.

  4. I was born with tga and had surgery when I was 4 days old, which happened to be my mom's *4*0th birthday. Never give up hope.

  5. I was born with this but I am now 14 and is completely okay! I have a heart checkup every 4 years now 💕

  6. My question is from where the pt is taking its blood???
    As it was supplied and drained from pulmonary art.and pulmonary vein
    Does aorta supply it??

  7. Why can’t they just use a prosthetic valve to replace the tricuspid instead of forming all of those defects?

  8. Do any of you guys with tga have a pacemaker as well ? Because I do. I've never met anyone with my condition before in all my 30 years of life. Hi everybody.

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