Stress Management: Faculty Interview, Foundations

Stress Management: Faculty Interview, Foundations


Hi, I’m Tim Berthold,
and I’m a teacher at City College
of San Francisco. And I’m Jill Tregor,
also an instructor at City College
of San Francisco. We wanted to talk
today about stress, and not just the stress that a
community health worker feels, but the stress that a
client can experience. Stress is so much a part
of chronic conditions, and we really think
that you can help a client in managing
that stress. I think that being able to help
clients recognize that stress is unavoidable, helping
them to understand what a huge contributing factor
it is in chronic conditions, in depression, and diabetes,
and eventually working with them to help them build
on what they already know how to do to better
manage the stress. I think if you ask a client
what are some things you do to relax, even if
they haven’t often taken the time to relax,
they do know some things that they like to do. It might be listening to music. It might be taking a walk. But I think having a CHW really
support that, encourage that, and say, I am concerned
for your health and I think part of how
to take care of yourself can be to make sure you’re
monitoring your own stress, is a great thing. And it doesn’t need to be
like you’re going to go to a meditation class. Or, if
you’ve never meditated before, suddenly you’re going to do it,
and you’re going to do it 12 times a day. It’s really building on what
people already know how to do. So I think you mentioned
listening to music, and that’s a great one. It’s a common one for people. And the conversation
can just really be about when’s the last
time you listened to music? Tell me about the kind of
music you like to listen to. Where are you when
you listen to it, and what’s the
effect of listening to music that helps you
to better manage stress? It’s about sort of
growing their awareness and then asking them to try
to put it a little bit more into practice each day,
starting, if possible, today or tomorrow. So I think helping a client
think about how they’re actually going to
de-stress, and then also helping them think
about what they can look for in their own body
and mind that will tell them that they need to
stop for a minute and focus on de-stressing,
both of those things are really important. And I think that they’re really
easy ways, in a lot of ways, to support a client. And at the same time, this
can also be a reminder to you that you need to try to practice
what you’re teaching the client and take a moment
to do what you know how to do to
relieve your stress.

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