Inside California Education: Community Colleges Episode 3

Inside California Education: Community Colleges Episode 3


Annc: Coming up on
“Inside California Education: Community Colleges” Explore how
community colleges have become one of California’s biggest
training grounds for nurses. Visit the viticulture and winery
program at Napa Valley College, where students learn winemaking
from the vineyard… to the table. Discover a unique partnership
between Tesla and a community college in San Jose — training
students to work on the latest electric vehicles. Explore a new agreement aimed at
increasing the number of transfer students at UC Campuses
across the state. And discover what careers take
flight from an aviation program in Sacramento. It’s all next, on Inside
California Education: Community Colleges! Annc 2: Inside California
Education: Community Colleges is made possible by: College Futures Foundation
believes nothing is more transformative for individuals
and our society than an educational opportunity. We partner with organizations
and leaders across California to help students earn college
degrees regardless of zip code, skin color, or income. More information at
collegefutures.org. ♪♪ ♪♪ Lynn Yamakawa: You can’t just
come to this program and think that you’re going to get a job.
It requires so much more. Lynn: I order to do
nursing you need to have compassion and
empathy and I truly believe that most of our students come
here because of that. Rob: THESE STUDENTS ARE PART
OF AN INTENSIVE NURSING PROGRAM AT LOS ANGELES HARBOR
COLLEGE… Lynn: In addition to the basic
skills that nurses need, we teach them critical thinking
They need to be able to work in a team and collaborate
with other people. Student: If you open it then,
yeah Lynn: They need to be able to
make critical decisions at the
bedside. Rob: SINCE 1963, THIS COMMUNITY
COLLEGE HAS BEEN TRAINING NURSES THROUGH A MIX OF
CLASSROOM WORK… Instructor: Ok, let’s have two
volunteers come up.. Student: Hello, good morning. Rob: …AND REAL-WORLD
WORKING ENVIRONMENTS. Student: This is Cindy, she’ll
be your nurse today Rob: THE COLLEGE HAS A
MOCK EMERGENCY ROOM WITH MANNEQUINS. THE TEACHERS ARE NEXT DOOR
MONITORING THE SCREENS… Instructor: I hope my blood
pressure isn’t going higher Rob: AND “SPEAKING”
FOR THE MANNEQUIN. Instructor: This is incredible
pain it’s really hurting in my chest. Having mannequins here
helps us to physically practice. It gives us the opportunity to
make mistakes here, figure out what we need to do, before we
actually go to the hospital and take care of an actual
patient. Tonna: The faculty here they’re
all experienced. They’ve all been working in a
nursing field. Instructor: Class we’re going to
be listing symptoms of
Schizophrenia. Tonna: And so they have a very
clear understanding of nursing they understand how it feels to
go into the nursing program. Rob: GETTING INTO THIS NURSING
PROGRAM IS NOT EASY… Lynn: So we have about 600
applicants for year and we admit
80 per year. So we have many more applicants
than spaces available. Rob: COMMUNITY COLLEGES
DRAMATICALLY EXPANDED AFTER WORLD WAR II AS VETERANS
RETURNED TO CALIFORNIA… WITH ONE OF THE EARLY
FOCUSES ON NURSING. Eloy Ortiz Oakley: Certainly
after World War II there was a need to increase the
healthcare workforce. A nursing degree is a two-year
degree, an associate’s degree in nursing, so this was a perfect
opportunity for community colleges to begin offering those
programs. They really became the hub to
train uh, registered nurses, and those programs continue to
thrive throughout the state. Rob: TODAY MORE THAN EVER
THERE IS A CRITICAL NEED FOR NURSES… Nancy Blake: Over the
next 10 to 15 years many of the Baby Boomers are going to retire
and we need to have more students in the pipeline
to be able to hire to fill those positions. Rob: IT’S UP TO SCHOOLS LIKE
HARBOR COLLEGE TO HELP FULFILL THAT RAPIDLY GROWING NEED… Francisco Rodriguez: The
community colleges educate and train 80% of First Responders
and nurses in the state of California. So we’re essential to the
performance of and to the deployment of healthcare
professionals in California. Lynn: Our program is over 50
years old and we have strong roots in the community
and have long -standing relationships with
Community Partners. Rob: ONE SUCH PARTNER IS
HARBOR-UCLA MEDICAL CENTER WHERE STUDENTS FROM
HARBOR COLLEGE GAIN REAL- WORLD EXPERIENCE
WORKING WITH PATIENTS. Nurse: Good morning my name is
Michael I’m your nurse today and I’m working with two nurses.
This is Mo and Kailah. Kailah: It’s been really good
but really challenging. There’s so much work that we
have to do, but it really prepares us for when we come to
the hospitals and actually work with real patients. Mo: So I’m going to be doing a
head to toe assessment. And I’m going to start with your
neurological assessment. To be able to connect with
our patients is, you know, a big part of what we
do on a daily basis. Mo: You can look straight ahead
for me. Perfect. Mo: When I get to you know get
to know them, you know, not just as a patient on the chart, but
to get to you know, understand their story and to treat them
like people, ultimately. Nancy Blake: It’s good that
we have a relationship with Harbor College because we
actually get to know those students. We know that they’ve been able
to be a good student nurse, they are responsible, they’re
critical thinkers, and that’s what we look for in the nurses
that we hire. Lynn: Nursing is a great career. There are so many opportunities. It will only grow, we will
always need nurses. Man: Her respiration is
at 22… Nursing is a rigorous program
its rigorous but with the support from us they succeed. Annc: Did you know? Seven out of ten nurses in
California receive their training at a California
community college. ♪♪ (HENRY CRANKING TOOL) Henry: Today we’re doing a lab
that consists of replacing a headlamp in case something
happens to it. Kristen: HENRY MENA MOVED ALL
THE WAY ACROSS THE COUNTRY FROM NEW JERSEY TO SAN JOSE.
AFTER BEING ACCEPTED TO THIS UNQUE TRAINING PROGRAM FOR
TESLA SERVICE TECHNICIANS. Henry: No other company can
provide this kind of training so just being able to get in, learn
how this works from the ground up, it was a great opportunity
for me to join. Kristen: HENRY IS ONE OF 12
STUDENTS IN THE TESLA START PROGRAM, OFFERED AT ONLY SIX
COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN THE UNITED STATES, INCLUDING HERE
AT EVERGREEN VALLEY COLLEGE IN SAN JOSE. “Trim and we need … yeah, this
guy. For sure ” Kristen: STUDENTS ARE TAUGHT
BY TESLA EMPLOYEES IN A MODERN-DAY AUTOMOTIVE SHOP,
LEARNING THE LATEST IN ELECTRIC VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY. Maniphone: The more cars Tesla
had out on the road, the more the cars needed to be serviced. It was a new generation of
workforce that needed to be cultivated. Natalie: We’ve had a high
ramp up of our model 3 which is one of our most
popular models, so of course the more that we sell, service is
going to be a high growing field so it’s pretty much just ramping
them up for their career within our company. Kristen: STUDENTS SPEND EIGHT
HOURS A DAY, FIVE DAYS A WEEK IN THIS CLASSROOM AUTO SHOP. HALFWAY THROUGH THE PROGRAM,
THEY ADD A SIXTH DAY AT A NEARBY TESLA SERVICE STATION. THEY’RE PAID TO LEARN, AND AT
THE END OF THREE MONTHS, THEY’RE READY FOR A CAREER AS A TESLA
SERVICE TECHNICIAN AT ONE OF MORE THAN 100 LOCATIONS ACROSS
NORTH AMERICA, WHERE EMPLOYEES WITH THESE SKILLS ARE IN VERY
HIGH DEMAND. Byron: They need folks trained
at a level that’s going to help propel the mission of their
company and we need to continue to provide opportunities to
community members to be able to take on these jobs of the
future. Kristen: IN TESLA’S SEARCH FOR
TRAINING PARTNERS, EVERGREEN VALLEY COLLEGE WAS CONSIDERED A
PERFECT FIT. THE CAMPUS IS LOCATED IN THE
HEART OF THE SILICON VALLEY, NEAR A CURRENT TESLA SERVICE
STATION … AND THEY ALREADY HAD A HYBRID VEHICLE CURRICULUM. Byron: It gives us the ability
as a community college to showcase the fantastic faculty
and staff that we have here, our ability to develop first rate
partnerships here in Silicon Valley and to give our students
an opportunity to participate in the new economy
as we call it now. Kristen: INSTEAD OF ENGINES,
THESE STUDENTS WORK PRIMARILY ON COMPUTERS AND ON THE NEWEST
VEHICLES TESLA HAS … LEARNING TECHNOLOGY THAT’S SO
EXCLUSIVE, THEY HAVE TO SIGN A NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT JUST TO
BE IN THE CLASS. Natalie: You’re learning
different programming, you’re learning how to communicate with
the vehicle not necessarily working on just manual parts but
actually utilizing software-based programs,
specialty programs only Tesla uses. Natalie: Organization is
going to be the biggest part of this lab activity. Maniphone: They are the initial
the pioneers of being the workforce for electrical cars. Kristen: IT’S A JOB THAT LOOKS
MUCH DIFFERENT THAN YOUR DAD’S AUTOMOTIVE SHOP. THERE ARE NO OIL CHANGES, SPARK
PLUGS, OR EMISSION CHECKS. INSTEAD, STUDENTS LEARN
BATTERY ARCHITECTURE, AND CHARGING TECHNOLOGY. Chess: Being a service
technician we’re always on our toes. We’re always trying to figure
out the new thing to fix and it’s not just hardware it’s
always software as well. Kristen: AS FOR WHO MAKES A GOOD
TESLA SERVICE TECHNICIAN, THIS TEACHER, WHO IS A GRADUATE OF
THE START PROGRAM HERSELF, SAYS IT’S MOSTLY ABOUT
…THE MISSION. Natalie: They are going to have
a little bit of automotive background, we do request that,
but we really are looking for more of a personality fit and
being able to want to accomplish our mission statement and our
goal as a company. Michael: Since that’s the new
technology for the future these students are able to be a part
of the future now so as the technology grows they grow with
it. So it’s a wonderful position to
be in. Kristen: FOR HENRY, HE SAYS THE
PROGRAM OFFERS HIM MORE THAN JUST A NEW CAREER…
IT’S ALSO A CHANCE TO MAKE A REAL DIFFERENCE Henry: You’re able to contribute
more to the mission of transitioning the world to
sustainable energy so just being involved in a mission that’s
bigger than yourself. ♪♪ ♪♪ (picking grapes) Christina: It’s the first day of
harvest at Napa Valley College. In the heart of wine country,
these community college students are picking about 1,500
pounds grapes… …grapes that they’ll next
learn how to turn into wine sold at Whole Foods. Paul: Our program is the
backbone of the wine industry. They’re taking our students
faster than we can create them. I mean, I have more job requests
coming across my desk than I do students to fill them. So we’ve got our different
Chardonnay clones, those are getting pretty ripe.
22, 21.5. Christina: Paul Gospodarczyk
runs the Viticulture and Winery Technology Program at Napa
Valley College. Named a 40 under 40 Tastemaker
by Wine Enthusiast magazine, he’s leading the next generation
of winemakers …at a program that’s grown to be the largest
in the world. (Paul Teaching) Paul: Almost all of our students
are already working in the wine industry. And it makes teaching an
absolute thrill because everyone is coming in with firsthand
experience of all the winemaking approaches that I’m talking
about, of the chemistry that we’re talking about and
it just makes for a really dynamic environment. Dr. Kraft: There’s three strands
really of study that have made the institution pretty famous. One is viticulture, working in
the vines. The second is really winemaking
and all the technology that goes into that, and the third is wine
sales and marketing, how to sell it, how to bottle it, how to
brand it. Christina: For Felipe Silva, the
program offered him a path to his dream of someday owning his
own wine label… a dream born in fields
just like this one. Felipe: Basically my whole
family has been working in the fields for most of their life,
coming from Mexico. Growing up, I was kind of just
exposed to the industry, going out and working on weekends with
my dad, uncles, other family members, and as the years went
by I just started growing this interest in the industry. Molly: So this is, have you seen
this before? Like the real botrytis. All this gray stuff is the
mycelium of the fungus. It’s like the fruiting body. I am passionate about
really bringing the managerial side of the wine industry to
young people from Napa who have grown up here, who have seen
this whole industry their whole lives and not really been a part
of it and not really understood what’s going on. And now they come here. They all of a sudden are
connecting all of these dots with, “Oh, that is what’s going
on, that’s what that was, and you see people connecting the
dots about what they’ve basically been exposed to their
entire lives. Dr. Craft: At the community
college level, our goal is to really serve the community. So Napa is ground zero, if you
will, for all of wine and it makes great sense. If we were in Detroit we would
probably be in a car manufacturing plant right now. But here, it’s that it’s our
role really to prepare the workers for the entire county. Christina: You’ll find more than
a half a dozen types of grapes on the 5-acre student vineyard
at Napa Valley College. Wines produced from these
grapes are well-respected, some scoring above 90 points in The
Wine Advocate. Molly: Napa is an ideal place
for grape growing. Peggy: We’re very lucky to have
this program here. There are very few winemaking
programs across the United States. Christina: Peggy Bolle already
has a bachelor’s degree and experience in the wine industry. She took almost two decades off
to raise her children. Now, she’s at Napa Valley
College, refreshing her skills. Peggy: The quality of education
here is equal to that that you’ll get anywhere. (Joe making dry ice) Christina: Joe Zwack retired
from the US Coast Guard, and looked to the community
college to see if he could turn his love of wine…
into a second career. Joe: Being on the consumer end
of it for so long, I often wondered what happens behind the
scenes with the winemaking and to back it up, getting the
grapes into the winery and processing them. So it’s a lot more complicated
and it takes a lot longer than I originally thought. Molly: If I touch it, you can
see the spores release. Paul: I wish more people knew
how amazing our students were. Christina: Paul says he’s
impressed every day by his students… those who work
all day at a winery or in the fields, then attend his classes
at night… or those learning a new trade
for the very first time. Paul: My highest aspiration, my
highest professional aspiration is to be right here
doing this job. And most of my teacher
colleagues here are the exact same way. This wasn’t a fallback job, this
is the job that we want. We love being teachers and we
love our discipline and the fact that we can do both of those
with these amazing students is just, we’re pretty lucky. Annc: Still ahead on “Inside
California Education: Community Colleges”
Aviation careers get off the ground at Sacramento City
College, with programs that include careers as air traffic
controllers and aircraft dispatchers. But first…
a new effort is underway to make transferring to the UC
system even easier for community college students. ♪♪ Leo: Because I was home
-schooled, I was really worried about even thinking
about trying to go to a four-year university right away
because I had never sat in a classroom before. So enrolling in in community
college was really kind of perfect for me. Michael: Leo Naab is taking
classes at the Davis branch of Sacramento City College, with
plans to transfer to nearby UC Davis to study engineering. Leo: I think you’re finding
the prime of that, I believe that’s the answer. Michael: Leo’s path to UC Davis
is set, as long as he meets certain academic requirements,
through what’s known as the Transfer Admission Guarantee. Leo: Without the transfer
guarantee I would have been pretty lost honestly because I
wouldn’t know which colleges I would have even a chance at
getting into. So the transfer guarantee
is really given me a security. Dr. King: Transferring can be
complicated at times when a student starts at a community
college, and the guarantees bring clarity to that process
that I think has a great value for the students. Michael: Six UC campuses have
long offered a Transfer Admission Guarantee to eligible
community college students, including UC Davis, Irvine,
Merced, Riverside, Santa Barbara and Santa Cruz. Tanks to a new agreement,
freshmen students who started at community colleges in 2019 will
be able to transfer to all nine UC campuses. It ensures that students
do know that they have a place at a at a UC campus. It is a way to support students
who might be the first in their family to go to college and may
not even imagine that a university degree is attainable. Tour Leader: I’m here to show
you our newest facility here this is the Pitzer Center it was
built in 2016 Elda: I think it was towards my
second year Community College at they told me that I could
actually have a more chance of getting accepted to it UC – more
so than a person going straight off of high school
to a four-year. And so that idea intrigued me. Michael: Elda Ibarra is a
student at Butte College in Oroville. She, and dozens of other
community college students from around the state, are
attending an event at UC Davis to learn more about the
transfer process. Blas: I think that sometimes
there is a misperception that students have that
they can’t get to the University of California. That it’s only for the top
students, that it’s only for the elite students. And I tell the student if you
have a 2.8 or 3.2 at the community college, you are
a top student. And you can come here and
you can achieve and do well. Tour leader: We always produce
a free concert every Thursday at noon. Michael: For every two freshmen
admitted to UC Davis, one transfer student is admitted as
well… making transfer students a significant part of the
student body here. Ebony: We have a lot of transfer
students who are might be the first in their family to go to
college, a lot of our transfer students might be coming from
historically underrepresented communities. Sometimes the students have
families and they may have other type of work
experience. And with that brings a unique
perspective as well and diversity to the campus. Cesar: I go to San Joaquin Delta
College in Stockton, California. My parents immigrated from Latin
America, so you know, I’ve always roots there in the
Central Valley. Michael: Cesar Castaneda was
accepted to a four year university straight out of high
school, but chose to attend a community college instead to
help out his parents. But now, he’s ready to transfer
to fulfill his dream of becoming a lawyer helping immigrant
children. Cesar: Generally a lot of people
they don’t see themselves that they belong in a university like
this, coming from such a small institution to you know,
something huge like this. You know, it’s it is
nerve-racking and I’m super grateful that they have this
opportunity for us, you know, baby step way into a real good
thing like this. Ebony: We’re here to motivate
students. We want to make sure that
they’re motivated, that they know there’s a place for them
here and that they belong. Michael: As for Leo, he
says he wouldn’t have changed anything about his college
career so far. Leo: The transfer agreement
really is maybe the option that I go with even if I could get
into a four-year right away because I’ve really enjoyed
Sacramento City College. So I’m really glad that I took
this path. Annc: More than 50 percent of
California State University graduates started at a community
college, while nearly 30 percent of University of California
graduates began at a two- year school. ♪♪ Alexis: Sacramento International
Airport. 11 o clock.
E120 -5000. Do you have in sight? Steve: Air traffic controllers
may spend their careers with their eyes on the sky…
but they start their training on the ground…
in programs like this one at Sacramento City
College. Sean: You don’t know that
UPS is going to see Coast Guard. Tom: We’re one of the few
programs in the state. In fact, Sacramento City College
is the only aviation program in the northern part of the state. Alexis: So I’ve been flying
literally my whole entire life. I remember being a unaccompanied
minor, and being perfectly fine go on planes by myself. Steve: Alexis Ford-Beckham
already has a bachelor’s degree in history, but enrolled in the
community college’s air traffic control program to learn a
different skill set. Alexis: It’s something that you
don’t learn when you’re younger. So it’s all new information and
it’s something that I just drive myself to wanting to know more
know more about it because not a lot of people do know. Alexis: Runway 16 right
or 10 right. Sean: The goal of this program
is for the students to come out of here and become controllers. Steve: Instructor Sean Tener
teaches his students everything they need to know in order to be
accepted to – and pass — the FAA Academy. Once they pass the FAA’s
rigorous standards, he says they’re on a solid career path. Sean: It’s a great job. I did it for 27 years and
retired at age 46. I’ve been asked over the years,
‘what makes a person a good candidate to be a controller?’
And my answer is always been, ‘someone who can make very
quick common-sense decisions and multitask.’ Steve: Sacramento
City College is one of the oldest community colleges
in the state… with a long history tied to
aviation and aeronautics. Dr. King: Back in the 30s,
preparing in the run-up to World War II, there were very specific
needs in the community and the aeronautics program was created
to respond as the nation was preparing for war. So the program evolved to meet
the needs then. And has continued to evolve,
right to the current day. Steve: Those current day
programs include air traffic control, aircraft maintenance,
flight technology and aircraft dispatch. Tom: The aircraft dispatcher
program. The best job in aviation that no
one knows about. Tom: And then, look at the
Sacramento NOTAM Steve: Students in Tom Burg’s
aircraft dispatch class can go on to earn a one-year
certificate, or two year degree, that will prepare them to
pass an FAA exam. Tom: An aircraft dispatcher is
responsible for all of the pre-flight planning.
So, that person has a lot of responsibility
before the flight. They’re also the airline
representative that is in constant contact with the
flight. Eyoel: Pilots taxing on taxi way Eyoel: I’ve always been
interested in aviation. I used to I used to wait for my
mom at the airport, and it kind of seemed like it has life
there, you know. Everybody had a purpose
everybody was going somewhere. Steve: Eyoel Abraha is a native
of Ethiopia, who initially wanted to be a pilot. But flying lessons were too
expensive, so he instead turned to dispatch. Eyoel: Dispatcher is really
interesting. It just you’re always doing
something, you’re not like it’s not like a boring office job,
you know. You’re always doing something. Robbie: So the terminal approach
radar – out of service. Steve: No matter how challenging
the course can be at times. Students can rest assured
— they’re in good hands. Tom: At the end of this course,
the FAA will send an examiner here to give their practical
exams. In eight years, we’ve only had
two students that didn’t pass on the first try. So it’s a pretty good program. Tom: What’s the problem with
Oakland? Dr. King: As the industry
continues to evolve, the close relationship that our faculty
have with people in the industry, we will be prepared to
help train students for the needs of the industry moving
forward. ♪♪ Annc: That’s it for this
edition of Inside California Education: Community Colleges. If you’d like more information
about the program, log on to our website insidecaled dot org. You can watch stories from all
of our shows, and you can connect with us on social media. Thanks for joining us. We’ll see you next time on
Inside California Education. ♪♪ ♪♪ Annc 2: Inside California
Education: Community Colleges is made possible by: College Futures Foundation
believes nothing is more transformative for individuals
and our society than an educational opportunity. We partner with organizations
and leaders across California to help students earn college
degrees regardless of zip code, skin color, or income. More information at
collegefutures.org. ♪♪

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