Diabetes Information You Can Trust

Diabetes Information You Can Trust


(upbeat music) – Hi, I’m Joan Lunden. Now more than ever, people are seeking
information about diabetes. It is the most searched chronic
illness on the internet. But how can you be sure
what’s posted is accurate and scientifically valid? The Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention can be a really valuable resource, providing information
that is medically sound, and it’s free. Joining me now is Dr. Ann Albright, director of the CDC’s Division
of Diabetes Translation, and their associate
director of communications Stephanie Creel. Hi, ladies. – Hi.
– Hi. – All right we’re gonna go over the top terms that are searched, but you can go from site to site and get conflicting information. What’s your advice? – Absolutely. It’s really tough and
sometimes it can feel like information overload and
people don’t know what’s right or what’s exactly the case for them, so at CDC we work really hard to cull down that scientific information,
pull it all together in one place. Our website has all sorts
of resources for people. It’s sort of a one-stop shop. – All right. Top term searched about
diabetes, diabetes mellitus? – Diabetes mellitus is the technical term, the medical term for the
diagnosis of diabetes. People may hear that as
they’re being diagnosed. – The next most searched terms
were type 1 and then type 2. – Type 1 diabetes is
an autoimmune disease. It means the body is attacking
those important cells that make insulin. So people with type 1
have to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is a situation
where you’re not using your insulin properly. So you may be treated with insulin or you may be treated with pills. For both forms of diabetes,
lifestyle is critical. – Not surprisingly,
heavily searched, symptoms. – Yes, there are a number
of symptoms for diabetes. Some of them are excessive
thirst, frequent urination. You may have blurry vision. You may be fatigued. The real situation here,
though, is that people may not have those symptoms as obviously or they may not recognize
them as something that needs to be followed up on. – All right. Good information, need that follow-up. Thank you. And to find out more answers to all of your diabetes questions, visit cdc.gov/diabetestv. We’ll see you next time. I’m Joan Lunden. – [Announcer] Sponsored by
NACDD with support from the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. Visit cdc.gov/diabetestv.

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